Experience and License a Top Priority When Hiring Painting Contractor

Have you ever gone into a paint store to ask a question about a painting job you are planning to start? Do you feel like you have received helpful feedback or did you possibly have an experience that was frustrating?

Whether you are planning to have the interior or exterior of your home newly painted, there are always questions to ask, so you look to your local paint company for the right answers, but you need to be cautious of who you go to with these questions. An incorrect response could lead to a lot of frustration and unnecessary expenditures on your part.

Not too long ago, I was in a paint store to pick up an order and overheard a painting contractor placing an order with the paint store clerk. He was planning to paint a screen enclosure for a client and had just pressure cleaned the aluminum in the enclosure. The painting contractor asked the store clerk what type of paint he should use on the aluminum structure. I noticed the clerk was unsure of his answer so I spoke up and recommended the type of paint that I use. I then asked the contractor if he had followed certain procedures, which I follow when I paint aluminum pool enclosures. He looked at me very oddly and then replied that he had not followed those procedures. I then asked him if he was going to use a chalk sealer on the aluminum and again, he responded “no.” I then asked him if he knew what a chalk sealer was. Again, he said “no.” I asked him if he was a licensed painting contractor and he said he is. I found this highly unlikely.

It is so important for a homeowner to do their homework, check a potential painting contractor’s license and credentials, and see if they have any reviews. Do not just hire the cheapest contractor. If this painting contractor that was in the paint shop does not properly prepare the aluminum in the screen enclosure prior to painting it, the paint on the enclosure will eventually just start to peel off. Correcting this type of error is not a simple job and could cause a homeowner a lot of unnecessary grief and expense. Getting a contractor who has committed the error in the first place to correct their error is another level of frustration that could cause the homeowner avoidable stress.

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